02 February – Heart Health

Your fork, fingers and feet can determine your fate via Dr. Joel Kahn #amateahora

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Imagine walking out of the doctor’s office for your check up at age 50 and beaming because you were told that you were at super low risk for heart disease. In fact, the doctor said you had ideal levels of blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose and smoking status. Would you be surprised that ideal levels are found in only a small number of those checked? Did they get their healthy heart status by luck or did they have lifestyle habits early in life that promoted winning the “ideal” status banner? Can you plan, even in your teens or 20’s to do the same? read more http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/plant-powered-diet-youth-healthy-heart/

Love you momma Madrigal

CARDIA Study Shows Choices Matter When it Comes to Preventing Heart Disease

The Coronary Artery Risk Development in (Young) Adults Study or CARDIA has been studying the health of thousands of people recruited when they were 18-30 years old and followed for 20 years or more. They reported on habits associated with having this “ideal” heart status and the lessons are instructive and simple for all. At the beginning of the study, 44 percent had low risk heart status mainly because they were so young, and the “ideal” measurements by 20 years of follow-up fell to 25 percent of the group. Apparently things like getting older, jobs and raising families challenge us to remain on a healthy path.

The researchers looked at five simple lifestyle habits to see how they related to having the low cardiac risk at year 20. These habits were: not smoking, optimal body weight, and diet habits that incorporated higher amounts of fiber (think plants), potassium (think plants), calcium (think nuts and seeds) and less saturated fats (again think plants.) Regular physical activity and average alcohol intake (vs. none) were the other lifestyle habits measured. They also looked at a second score (AHEI) of food items and gave point for higher levels of eating vegetables, fruit, fish and poultry, non-meat protein like nuts and soy, whole grains, low trans fats, moderate alcohol intake, and a higher polyunsaturated to saturated fat intake.

The Results Are In

Drum roll please! Whether judged by the five lifestyle habits or the multi-component AHEI food score, the better the lifestyle at a young age, the greater was the chance of ending up in middle age with a low heart disease risk status. It is not chance, it is lifestyle choices baby! You are in control. Your fork, fingers and feet can determine your fate.

For example, participants who practiced all five lifestyle habits had a 60 percent low risk heart status compared to participants with zero to one healthy habits who had about a five percent chance of being rated low risk in mid-life. That is a big difference that will result in a much better chance of living a normal span of years without illness and disability. The same trend and numbers existed for those with the highest points on the AHEI score vs the lowest. The most powerful predictor of ending up low risk in mid-life was…..never smoking as the other positive lifestyle habits were most common in those that also chose to never smoke. So give it up now if you are still smoking. Eat leaves, don’t smoke them!

From a Doc’s Perspective

I heard a piece of ancient Indian wisdom this week I want to share. It says “A person with health has 1000 dreams while a person without good health has only one dream.” The message of the CARDIA trial is that you are never too young, or too old, to plan to lower your risk of heart disease, the number one killer in Western society. Failing to plan is planning to fail and it will steal your dreams. Never smoke, eat lots of your damn vegetables and fruits, work out, stay thin by passing up on extra processed junk foods, and enjoy a glass of wine now and then. Please keep my waiting room empty.

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What is a Heart Murmur and How Does it Relate to Valve Problems? #amateahora

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If you have a heart murmur, you may be wondering what it means. Your physician may have told you that it was an “innocent murmur” or you may have been referred for further tests. This American Heart Association video explains the causes of heart murmurs and what you may need to know about your heart health. Visit http://www.heart.org/heartvalves for more information about valve problems.

Saving and Improving Lives in the Information Age at AHA Scientific Sessions 2014

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American Heart Association 2014 Scientific Sessions – “Four presenters: Laurie J Morrison, Gavin D Perkins, Carrie A. Sims, Martin Schreiber at” D2-ReSS1 – Chicago, IL #AHA14 Click the link above to view pictures of conference.

AHA2014_RW_SAT_AM00278a-X3AHA 2014 Scientific Sessions – Attendees and speakers at ReSS Session III: Best Abstract Awards acknowledged, Saturday November 15, 2014 during the American Heart Associations Scientific Sessions at the McCormick Convention Center.

What’s the big news at Scientific Sessions 2014? Hear from Dr. Elliott Antman, President of the American Heart Association and Dr. Mariell Jessup, Past President.

WomenHeart Sisters at Chicago FireHouse, celebrating our participation at the 2014 AHA Scientific Sessions

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ginormousThe American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions has the best science and leading cardiovascular conference for basic, translational, clinical and population science, in the United States. Scientific Sessions attracts more than 17,000 attendees, with a global presence from more than 100 countries. In addition to 1.5 million medical professionals who participated virtually in lectures and discussions about basic, translational, clinical and population science. 10649065_10152403783920267_8

WomenHeart sisters are preparing for our extraordinary opportunity to share our HeartStories and our passion for HeartHealth at the AHA Scientific Sessions. WomenHeart was founded by three women who had heart attacks while in their 40s. In addition to being faced with many obstacles, including misdiagnosis and social isolation, they were each amazed how little information about or services for women with heart disease were available and how the issue seemed invisible within the women’s health community. But in March 1999 everything changed. Today their are 650 National WomenHeart Community Educators, Support Network Coordinators, and Spokespersons.

10329908_891328514232486_4136584246206252191_oA few days ago! WomenHeart’s Interim Chief Executive Officer Mary McGowan attended the Hearst Magazines Master Class event in New York City that marks the launch of Fight the Ladykiller! Pictured on stage at the Hearst Master Class are Dr. Holly Andersen from the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute, WomenHeart Scientific Advisory Council member Dr. Noel Bairey Merz of Cedar Sinai Medical Center, and Barbra Streisand!

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This weeks AHA Scientific Session Programming is designed to improve patient care by communicating the most timely and significant advances in basic, clinical, translational and population health research, spanning the full spectrum of cardiovascular disease from a variety of perspectives, from prevention, through diagnosis and through treatment. Sessions includes five days of comprehensive, unparalleled education through more than 5,000 presentations, with 1,000 invited faculty, and 4,000 abstract presentations; all from the world’s leaders in cardiovascular disease. It also includes more than 200 exhibitors showcasing the latest cardiovascular technology and resources.

Leading the way to discovery in the fight against cardiovascular disease and stroke.

“As Mayor and on behalf of the City of Chicago, it is my pleasure to welcome the members of the American Heart Association gathered for the 2014 Scientific Sessions.”
ginormous-1Read all of Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s welcome letter (PDF).

When and Where

Nov 15-19, 2014
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL

Join me at The American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions, BEST leading science and cardiovascular conference.

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large-1IL- NOVEMBER 2014: The American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions for basic, translational, clinical and population science. Join the global leaders in the cardiovascular community in Chicago 2014- McCormick Place. Nov 15-19, 2014

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CHICAGO Hypertension Highlights at Scientific Sessions 2014

• Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Hypertension
Sunday, November 16, 2014, 5:30–6:45 pm
• Hypertension 2014
Monday, November 17, 2014, 9:00–10:15 am
• Contribution of Arterial Stiffness to the Development
of Hypertension: From Bench to Bedside
Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 7:30–8:45 am
• The Pressures of Aging
Tuesday, November 18, 2014, 5:30–6:45 pm
• Joint AHA/American Society of Hypertension Session:
Can We Identify Response Markers to Antihypertensive Drugs?
Wednesday November 19, 9:00–10:15 am

Chicago McCormick Place

Promo Code: LInFriend
Conference Packages Early Bird Was Through September 17, 2014

Members Get Discounts.http://my.americanheart.org/professional/Membership/Membership_UCM_316891_SubHomePage.jsp

Scientific Sessions – 5 Day Conference Package Description
Saturday, November 15–Wednesday, November 19

Includes access to the Scientific Sessions program for all 5 days and access to the Science & Technology Hall Sunday November 16-Tuesday, November 18th.
Does not include access to the Resuscitation Science Symposium, Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium, or Arrhythmia Research Summit. $225

Scientific Sessions – 1 Day Conference Package Description
Saturday, November 15–Wednesday, November 19

Includes access to the Scientific Sessions Conference program for 1 day and access to the Science & Technology Hall on that same day.
Cannot be combined with the Resuscitation Science Symposium 2 Day Conference, Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium, or Arrhythmia Research Summit. $600

Saturday (exhibits closed) SundayMondayTuesdayWednesday (exhibits closed)
Resuscitation Science Symposium 2-Day Conference Package Description
Saturday, November 15–Sunday, November 16

Includes access to the Resuscitation Science Symposium program on both days and access to the Science & Technology Hall Sunday, November 16.
Does NOT include access to the Scientific Sessions Conference, Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium or Arrhythmia Research Summit. $100

Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium 2-Day Conference Package Description
Tuesday, November 18–Wednesday, November 19

Includes access to Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Symposium on both days and access to the Science & Technology Hall Tuesday, November 19.
Does NOT include access to the Scientific Sessions Conference, Resuscitation Science Symposium, or Arrhythmia Research Summit. $225

Arrhythmia Research Summit – 1 Day Conference Package Description
Wednesday, November 19

Access to the Arrhythmia Research Summit program ONLY.
Does NOT include access to the Scientific Sessions Conference, Resuscitation Science Symposium, Cardiovascular Nursing Clinical Nursing Symposium, or the Science & Technology Hall since the Hall will be closing on Tuesday, November 18th. $225

SCAD came without warning. Causing heart attacks in pregnant women and women under 50. Learn more.

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Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection, or SCAD Posted by In the Loop (@intheloop) Mayo Clinic.

Sharonne Hayes, M.D., founder of Mayo’s Women’s Heart Clinic in Rochester and one of the country’s leading researchers of SCAD, tells The Times that most SCAD patients don’t show any “traditional” heart attack symptoms of signs. The condition occurs when a tear forms suddenly in one of the blood vessels in the heart, slowing or blocking blood flow to the heart. “The vast majority of the patients we’ve seen with SCAD have whistle clean arteries,” she adds.

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SCAD Research, Inc. The presentation of the ceremonial check to Mayo Clinic represents the hard work and support of SCAD Survivors and their families as well as those families whose loved one did not survive. Thank you to everyone who has worked so hard to reach this milestone! Read more: http://intheloop.mayoclinic.org/…/mayos-scad-research-gets…/

CHECK OUT THIS VIDEO ON SCAD 30secs https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=680868088625595

Testimonials
Judy Alico was just 51, with low blood pressure, low cholesterol, not overweight, and a non-smoker. She had a sudden heart attack and was not as lucky. Heidi lived to tell her story and work to help others. Judy’s husband, Bob, has made the search for answers his life’s work. Both came to Mayo Clinic to present a $100,000 check for research into spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD. And they brought their personal stories with them.

Heidi Henson was young, a marathon runner who took good care of herself, and she nearly died of a heart attack at age 35. Judy Alico was just 51, with low blood pressure, low cholesterol, not overweight, and a non-smoker. She had a sudden heart attack and was not as lucky. Heidi lived to tell her story and work to help others. Judy’s husband, Bob, has made the search for answers his life’s work. Both came to Mayo Clinic to present a $100,000 check for research into spontaneous coronary artery dissection, or SCAD. And they brought their personal stories with them.

The Mayo Clinic SCAD Research Program has a new web page!
All the information patients and providers and collaborators need to know and access about SCAD and how to participate in our research or get an appointment in our SCAD Clinic. www.mayo.edu/research/scad

¿Sabía usted que la enfermedad cardiaca es la principal causa de muerte entre las mujeres y las hispanas están en mayor riesgo?

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Campaña Nacional Para Crear Conciencia Sobre la Importancia de la Salud del Corazón de las Mujeres.

Un reciente estudio indica que por lo menos el 71% de las mujeres hispanas tienen por lo menos un factor de riesgo asociado con enfermedades cardiacas.

Honored to make a difference by representing Illinois as a multicultural bilingual (Español/English) leader. There are now 650 WomenHeart Champions (reps in 49 states), 129+ Support Network Coordinators (SNC) (reps in 39 states) and 25% are women of color. The Class of 2014 had 40 of us on-boarding as National WomenHeart representatives. We attended the Mayo Clinic Science & Leadership Symposium in MN. http://www.womenheart.org

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ÁmateAhora is the only representative flying in from IL on-track as Bilingual Spokesperson and Co-Support Network Coordinator in a class of 40 national reps, we were 1 of 2 bilingual Spanish Speaking representatives. Special thanks to Alberta England and Eva Maciejewski for nominating and support us as we officiated. We will be supporting the Chicago-West Heart Health Network at Rush. Am a National Speaker for the Para la Mujer Hispana, WomenHeart Program.

WomenHeart is the only national organization dedicated to advancing women’s heart health through advocacy, community education and patient support. As the leading voice for the 41 million American women living or at risk of heart disease. WomenHeart advocates for equal access to quality care and provides information and resources to help women take charge of their heart health.

Join me for our Monthly MeetUp for Women with Heart Disease http://t.co/59fDG4x9TL
Wednesday, November 12, 2014 (6-7:30PM) and Wednesday, December 10, 2014 (6-7:30PM).

Join me for our Monthly MeetUp for Women with Heart Disease

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Join me at Rush/WomenHeart of Chicago West at our next meeting hosted by Rush Heart Center for Women. 

This patient support group is for women, of all ages, with or at risk for heart disease.

WomenHeart

Location:
Rush Oak Park Hospital’s Medical Office Building

2nd Floor, Room 2000, 610 S Maple St., Oak Park, IL

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 (6-7:30PM)

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Speaker: Dr. Lynne Braun, PhD, RN, CNP, Professor, Dept. of Adult and Gerontological Nursing, Rush

University College of Nursing,

Topic: Stress Management

LYNNE T. BRAUN, ANP, PHD, CNP, FPCNA, FAAN, FAHA

Dr. Lynne Braun is a nurse practitioner in the Rush Heart and Vascular Institute, focusing on preventive cardiology and women and heart disease. She is also a Professor in the Department of Adult Health and Gerontological Nursing in the Rush College of Nursing. She completed a PhD in Nursing Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1990, and a post-masters certificate as an Adult Nurse Practitioner from Rush University in 1997. She has been on faculty and has held a practice position at Rush University Medical Center since 1980. Her clinical and research interests include cardiovascular risk reduction, exercise, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension management. She served as co-investigator for 3 research grants funded by the National Institutes of Health, currently, a study entitled, “Reducing Health Disparity in African American Women: Adherence to Physical Activity.”  She is Past President of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association. Dr. Braun has been an active volunteer for the American Heart Association since 1980 in numerous capacities. Most recently, she served on the Board of Directors of the American Heart Association of Metropolitan Chicago, Medical Leadership Committee for Chicago’s Go Red Luncheon, Illinois Advocacy Committee, and is Chairperson of the Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing. Dr. Braun is regular speaker at the AHA Scientific Sessions on topics related to cardiovascular disease prevention. She is a co-author of four AHA/ACC Scientific Statements, the AHA/ACC statement on Performance Measures for the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, and 2 AHA clinical practice guidelines. Dr. Braun is an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, the American Heart Association, the Institute of Medicine of Chicago, the National Lipid Association, and the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 (6-7:30PM)

imgresSpeaker: Dr. Neelum T. Aggarwal, MD, Cognitive Neurologist, Rush Memory Clinic, Rush University Medical Center

Topic: “Pump” Brain and Cognition

NEELUM T AGGARWAL, M.D.

An Associate Professor in the Department of Neurological Sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and a steering committee member at Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Group, Dr. Aggarwal, is a cognitive neurologist with particular interest in all types of dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, fronto temporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia). In addition to her active clinical practice, she continues to conduct original research in a variety of large scale community-based studies. She is the co-investigator on multiple grants funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). In addition, she is a speaker to many community and business organizations that seek to gain a better understanding of the changes—cognitively and physically—in the aging process, and is an advisor for community-based and minority health initiatives.

A BREAKTHROUGH IN HEART PRESERVATION

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World’s first ‘dead heart’ transplants successful 

Jenn Gidman from Newser Staff reports, for 20 years, the heart transplant unit at Sydney’s St. Vincent’s Hospital has been working hard to figure out a way to transplant a dead heWorld first 'dead heart' transplant successfulart into a live patient. Doctors from Sydney’s St. Vincent’s Hospital announced their work had paid off.

“They have successfully completed three transplants using hearts that had stopped beating for 20 minutes”, said to be the first such transplants in the world, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

The secret to their success lies in cutting-edge technology and the preservation solution in which the non-beating hearts are immersed.

The heart is first placed in a special “heart in a box” machine that warms it up and keeps it beating for about four hours before the transplant operation. The preservation solution, which alone took 12 years to develop, minimizes damage to the organ after it has stopped beating and helps ensure it both survives the surgery and functions in the recipient’s body, Sky News reports.

OCS™ HEART: Portable Perfusion and Monitoring

TransMedics developed the OCS™ HEART system to overcome these challenges. This portable, warm perfusion and monitoring system is designed to

  • Increase transplantation volume
  • Improve patient outcomes
  • Reduce cost of patient care

The OCS™ HEART is commercially available in Europe and Australia and is in clinical use in leading centers. The system is not available for commercial use in the U.S.  It is under clinical investigation in the U.S. and Europe.

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Read more… http://www.kens5.com/story/news/2014/10/24/first-dead-heart-transplant/17829957/

The Role of Diet and Inflammation in Heart Disease

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Join Rush/WomenHeart of Chicago West at our next meeting hosted by Rush Heart Center for Women. This patient support group is for women, of all ages, with or at risk for, heart disease. 

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The Medical Office Building is at 520 S Maple Ave, Oak Park.  Take the elevator to the second floor and turn north when you get off the elevator.  We should be right there.  Please bring a friend.

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Date: Wednesday, October 8, 2014

6:00pm – 7:30pm

Location: Rush Oak Park Hospitals Medical Office Building

2nd Floor, Room 2000, 610 S Maple St., Oak Park, IL

Program: The Role of Diet and Inflammation in Heart Disease

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For more information on WomenHeart of Chicago West, contact

WH-ChicagoWest@womenheart.org or call (847) 404-2952 for additional information.

Complimentary parking around the hospital and medical building

Free of charge and priceless! light, heart healthy appetizers served.

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WomenHeart is the only national organization dedicated to advancing women’s heart health through advocacy, community education and patient support. As the leading voice for the 41 million American women living or at risk of heart disease, WomenHeart advocates for equal access to quality care and provides information and resources to help women take charge of their heart health